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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

clay original, 2013, available in bronze or resin editions of 10
20” x 16” x 11”

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg 2

clay original, 2013, available in bronze or resin editions of 10
20” x 16” x 11”

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Response to Random Murder I: September 11, 2001 New York City, 2,996 dead

2001
bronze, edition of 9
18” x 10” x 12”

I made this allegorical figure of my city soon after the attack: a statue of a beautiful, strong, nude, maternal figure who could survive even this level of aggression. photo by John Bigelow Taylor

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Response to Random Murder II: July 7, 2005, London, 52 dead

34” x 17” x 12
bonded marble, 2006

 

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Response to Random Murder II: July 7, 2005, London, 52 dead

34” x 17” x 12
bonded marble, 2006

 

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Cain

bonded bronze, gold leaf, 2008
26” x 26” x 2”

From a series of Renaissance-style bas-reliefs depicting Biblical characters in appropriate attitudes and situations that mimic the design of contemporary traffic signs. My intention is the opposite of Jasper Johns when he painted flags and maps; I want to take an image that has been stripped of narrative, character and any human particulars– a sign– and make it back into a symbol. Here, the Pedestrian Crossing becomes the wandering Cain.

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Urn

bonded bronze, edition of 14, 2006
14” x 12” x 12”

The size and shape of a standard wastebasket, this Urn is covered with bas-relief images of hands crumpling up sheets of paper with varying gestures of frustration or nonchalance. Accomplished contemporary poets posed for each hand, including Dick Davis, Dana Gioia, R.S. Gwynn, Rachel Hadas, Charles Martin, F.D. Reeve, Marilyn Taylor, Catherine Tufariello and David Yezzi

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Urn 2

bonded bronze, edition of 14, 2006
14” x 12” x 12”

The size and shape of a standard wastebasket, this Urn is covered with bas-relief images of hands crumpling up sheets of paper with varying gestures of frustration or nonchalance. Accomplished contemporary poets posed for each hand, including Dick Davis, Dana Gioia, R.S. Gwynn, Rachel Hadas, Charles Martin, F.D. Reeve, Marilyn Taylor, Catherine Tufariello and David Yezzi

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Urn 3

bonded bronze, edition of 14, 2006
14” x 12” x 12”

The size and shape of a standard wastebasket, this Urn is covered with bas-relief images of hands crumpling up sheets of paper with varying gestures of frustration or nonchalance. Accomplished contemporary poets posed for each hand, including Dick Davis, Dana Gioia, R.S. Gwynn, Rachel Hadas, Charles Martin, F.D. Reeve, Marilyn Taylor, Catherine Tufariello and David Yezzi.

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Sweetness and Light

Hydrocal cast, charcoal, edition of 12, 1993
14” x 17” x 1”

 

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The Reach

Hydrocal cast, edition of 12, 1993
17” x 14” x 1”

 

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Silent Head

cast resin, concrete, 1998
48“ x 27” x 20”

from the series Set of Sets, inspired by the resemblance between television sets and Roman tombs. In this Set, created for a 2 year installation in the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum Sculpture Garden, the “talking head” of broadcast news confronts the viewer with the ancient gesture of silence and complicity.

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Silent Head 2

cast resin, concrete, 1998
48“ x 27” x 20”

from the series Set of Sets, inspired by the resemblance between television sets and Roman tombs. In this Set, created for a 2 year installation in the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum Sculpture Garden, the “talking head” of broadcast news confronts the viewer with the ancient gesture of silence and complicity.

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Meanwhile

cast resin, 2000
48“ x 27” x 14”

from the series Set of Sets, inspired by the resemblance between television sets and Roman tombs. In this Set, created for an installation at the DeCordova Museum & Sculpture Park in Lincoln, MA, an adult-sized boy’s head rests in a television as in a coffin.

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Meanwhile 2

cast resin, 2000
48“ x 27” x 14”

from the series Set of Sets, inspired by the resemblance between television sets and Roman tombs. In this Set, created for an installation at the DeCordova Museum & Sculpture Park in Lincoln, MA, an adult-sized boy’s head rests in a television as in a coffin.

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Infant with Plume

bonded marble, edition of 20, 1996
10.75” x 8.5” x 1”

 

 

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Goddess

Hydrocal, paint, gold leaf (unique cast), 2010
15” x 11” x 10”

 

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Goddess 2

Hydrocal, paint, gold leaf (unique cast), 2010
15” x 11” x 10”

 

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The Invisible Struggle

marble, 1981
22” x 30” x 3”

 

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The Invisible Struggle 2

marble, 1981
22” x 30” x 3”

 

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Forbidden Fruit

Hydrocal cast, repeatable frieze, 1994
12” x 36” x 1”

 

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The Couple

modified plaster, 1990-95
49” x 11” x 11”

 

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The Couple (detail of The Husband)

modified plaster, 1990-95
49” x 11” x 11”

 

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The Couple (detail of The Wife)

modified plaster, 1990-95
49” x 11” x 11”

 

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Monument to Anonymous

modified ferrocement, 1984
31” x 23” x 33”

A monument to our most prolific sculptor, painter, composer and writer. As her/his name suggests, Anonymous is a mouse. Despite her/his absorption in work, one ear is tuned to our world. The other is focused on the page like a reading lamp. In its third public exhibition, in Central Park, NYC, Anonymous was installed on a pedestal with steps and was climbed on by over 10,000 people, not all of them children.

photo by Paul Warchol

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Monument to Anonymous 2

modified ferrocement, 1984
31” x 23” x 33”

A monument to our most prolific sculptor, painter, composer and writer. As her/his name suggests, Anonymous is a mouse. Despite her/his absorption in work, one ear is tuned to our world. The other is focused on the page like a reading lamp. In its third public exhibition, in Central Park, NYC, Anonymous was installed on a pedestal with steps and was climbed on by over 10,000 people, not all of them children.

photo by Paul Warchol

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Daphne Reconsidering

1988
100” x 84” x 60”

Daphne, many centuries after turning into a tree to escape Apollo’s amorous advances, begins to turn back into a woman. I love the insistence with which the shapes of human anatomy leap out from the natural world. I had been concerned with the absence of the human figure in contemporary sculpture, and related this to the Greek myth, to the possibility of Daphne regretting her ancient transformation and beginning to desire human form again.

photo by Paul Warchol

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Daphne Reconsidering 2

modified ferrocement, fabric, 1988
100” x 84” x 60”

Daphne, many centuries after turning into a tree to escape Apollo’s amorous advances, begins to turn back into a woman. I love the insistence with which the shapes of human anatomy leap out from the natural world. I had been concerned with the absence of the human figure in contemporary sculpture, and related this to the Greek myth, to the possibility of Daphne regretting her ancient transformation and beginning to desire human form again.

photo by Paul Warchol

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Tree with Nightgown

ballpoint pen, marker, 1982
17” x 14”

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Self-portrait Age 15

modified ferrocement, pigment, 1988
24” x 15” x 12”